Pen of the Day: Pelikan M600 Green o’Green and KWZ Iron Gall Green #4

Pelikan M600 Green o' Green with KWZ Iron Gall Green #4

Pelikan M600 Green o’Green with extra-fine nib. Loyal blog readers probably feel like they own this pen themselves, so often does it appear in these pages. It’s a favorite of mine, a limited edition from a few years ago.

I love a Pelikan gold nib. This is a Pelikan extra-fine, which usually means “not really fine,” except this ink really does help tighten the line.

Pelikan M600 Green o' Green with KWZ Iron Gall Green #4

The ink is KWZ Iron Gall Green #4. Here’s a closer look.

KWZ Iron Gall Green #4 writing sample

I’ll be doing a review, but you’ll note that the color of Iron Gall Green #4 looks a little darker in the first two photos. Sometimes it does: it depends on the pen and the ambient light. The third photo is what Iron Gall Green #4 usually looks like.

If you’d like to compare some other KWZ green inks, I’ve, ahem, used a few. Two dye-based inks, KWZ Rotten Green , and KWZ Foggy Green. Also two iron gall inks: KWZ Iron Gall Green Gold here and here, and KWZ Iron Gall Green #1, here.

Ink Review: Bung Box Dandyism

Bung Box Dandyism writing samples

Bung Box Dandyism. This is a very dark green ink, made by Sailor for Bung Box in Japan. It’s an appealing color that in some ways combines the best of Sailor greens. And it perfectly hits the recent craze for very saturated and wet inks. Unfortunately, it’s an expensive ink here in the US, or I think it would be more popular.

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Pen of the Day: Sheaffer PFM I in Green with Caran d’Ache Delicate Green

Sheaffer PFM I green

Sheaffer PFM I with medium nib. For my friend Jon, here’s my second PFM I, and first working one. It’s green, because, apparently all my pens now must be green. When I got this one, the nib wasn’t really writing well. It was a little misaligned, a little out of whack.

No worries. Because it’s a Sheaffer inlaid nib — which means, not like other nibs — and because I was going to the Ohio Pen Show, I took it to Ron Zorn. Ron did a little of this and a little of that (I was chatting), and boom, all fixed. He’s the Sheaffer master.

Sheaffer PFM I green

Probably it’s heretical, but I like the PFM I’s stainless-steel colored trim and plastic cap best of all the models. And the green. The PFM green is an unusual color. It’s not a forest green, but more a dark medium green. It usually looks lighter than in that photo.

Believe it or not, I don’t love the color green. And the PFM green isn’t conventionally attractive (to me). In fact it feels dated (to me). Paradoxically, that’s why this is my favorite. The blue, maroon and black PFMs are conventional colors, and more conventionally attractive. But the green is a little odd, and a little retro. It fits the pen.

So basically, I think the green PFM I is the coolest PFM, because it’s the most PFM.

And right now, it’s filled with my favorite green ink, Caran d’Ache Delicate Green. Which is really too pretty for this pen. But, hey, it’s almost the holiday season. It gets to dress up for a bit.

Sheaffer PFM I green with Caran d'Ache Delicate Green

 

I Came, I Saw, I Bought a Little: My Mostly Measly Ohio Pen Show Purchases

2016 Ohio Pen Show purchases

Okay, it’s a slim haul, but I’m sure you’ll identify with me saying that I still spent more than I intended at the Ohio Pen Show. I didn’t really intend to buy anything. And, yes, feel free to be aghast: there aren’t a lot of fountain pen things in the pile.

That’s because I went to the show with my 16-year-old daughter, and there is no way she could have spent two days shopping for fountain pens. Which is fine. I actually like other pens and pencils, too.

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More Montblanc Golden Yellow Ink: Comparisons

Montblanc Golden Yellow ink swab comparisons

Here’s a golden array of inks, with Montblanc Golden Yellow shining right in the middle.

We all know that colors look different depending on surrounding colors. And this is a perfect illustration. Look how unattractive the two amber inks seem when they flank Montblanc Golden Yellow.

In fact, J. Herbin Ambre de Birmanie and Pelikan Edelstein Amber are both lovely. In fact, they are favorites of mine. When they aren’t next to Montblanc Golden Yellow, the ambers are attractive golden brown inks with nice shading. So I should apologize for them looking so awful here.

Golden Yellow is so lively and so yellow-orange, that it deadens these amber inks. Not every ink looks good with every other. So here’s a link that shows how Ambre de Birmanie really looks, next to more congenial colors, and here’s one showing  Pelikan Edelstein Amber.

Now, I really like Golden Yellow, which is why it’s interesting that one of the inks in this array is an ink I intensely dislike. The ink that sets my teeth on edge is on the far right: Sheaffer King’s Gold. The King’s Gold is no longer in production, for which I applaud Sheaffer. But King’s Gold almost looks like a more orange, more brown Golden Yellow here, doesn’t it? Yet, to me, one is yay and one is nay.

It’s a reminder in (bright yellow) Broadway lights, that nothing beats testing an ink to see if it works for you.

Finally, it’s interesting how Diamine Sunshine Yellow is fairly close to Montblanc Golden Yellow.

Montblanc Golden Yellow ink swab comparisons

When you write with them, Montblanc Golden Yellow is darker (more orange) and more legible than Diamine Sunshine Yellow. That’s nearly impossible to see from the swabs. But you can tell from the swabs that there’s a lot of similarity.

And now I have one final twist, worthy of Hollywood: there is another.

Remember that Diamine operates on the principle that “if one ink is great, three nearly identical inks will be fantastic.” (That happens to be my motto, as well.) So you won’t be surprised to hear that Diamine has another ink, Diamine Amber, which is very close to Diamine Sunshine Yellow, and thus to Montblanc Golden Yellow, albeit browner.

I did not include a photo of Diamine Amber, because my photo array is full, the two Diamines are very close to each other, and I’ve already got two better amber inks in there. But I find it interesting. Inks. Even the yellow ones are interesting.

Pen of the Day: Nemosine Singularity with Sailor Jentle Tokiwa-Matsu

Nemosine Singularity with Sailor Tokiwa-Matsu

Nemosine Singularity with stub nib. It feels like forever since I’ve done a Pen of the Day, so here’s a reasonably-priced pen that’s new-to-me, the Nemosine Singularity.

I bought one with a stub nib, and I’m happy with it so far. The nib has a bit of feedback, which I like, but it’s a smooth writer with nice line variation and moderate to wet ink flow. It’s a medium stub, comparable to a Safari 1.1 mm nib, so good for everyday writing.

The nib itself is very large in size and has attractive stamping.

Nemosine Singularity with Sailor Tokiwa-Matsu

I’ve got my Nemosine Singularity inked with Sailor Jentle Four Seasons Tokiwa-Matsu, a nice evergreen ink with shading and sheen.

The Singularity design is pretty utilitarian, but the pen is a good size. The weight is light, but balanced, and the section is comfortable. The Singularity works for me unposted or posted. It comes with a converter, or you can use standard international cartridges. It also can be used as an eye-dropper. I think it’s a nice deal for under $20.

For a better idea of size, here are a Kaweco Classic Sport, a Lamy Vista, the Nemosine Singularity and a J. Herbin fountain pen.

Nemosine Singularity size comparison

Blast from the Past: Parker Penman Sapphire

Parker Penman Sapphire ink

A very nice friend found a partially full bottle of Parker Penman Sapphire for me, and it arrived on Friday.

I don’t chase vintage inks, so this will be my first and last bottle of this one, but it’s great to have more to use.  PPS is a great blue color, very deep, with nice shading. This ink is saturated, is not easy to clean, and it has red sheen out the wazoo. I like less saturated inks; I like easy-to-clean inks; and I’m neutral on sheen. And I still adore PPS. It is special.

I put it in a Kaweco AL-Sport with extra-fine nib this time.

Parker Penman Sapphire writing sample

 

More Inexpensive Fountain Pen-Friendly Paper: Wheat Straw Printer Paper

Step Forward Wheat Straw paper

Okay, I am not someone who delves deeply into the paper end of the fountain pen hobby, admittedly, but I was surprised by this one. Wheat straw paper?

Yes: wheat straw has been turned into paper.  Initially, this was puzzling. But my dad used to eat shredded wheat cereal for breakfast. That stuff definitely tasted like paper.

Thus, wheat straw paper. It works nicely with fountain pen inks, appears to be better for the environment than regular paper, and it’s inexpensive. So I’m going to give this a try.

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Our J. Herbin Caroube de Chypre Winner

J. Herbin 1670 Caroube de Chypre ink bottle

September 10, 2016 update:  Nicola did not claim the ink, so Caroube de Chypre is on its way to the second-place finisher Raffaello Palandri.

We have a winner for the giveaway for J. Herbin 1670 Caroube de Chypre, thanks to the Random.org, and that is Nicola. Congratulations to Nicola, and thanks to everyone who entered. This ink comes from Pen Chalet. We’re giving away a Platinum pen next, so watch the blog for that, too, in the coming days.

Nicola, please use the Contact menu at the top of the page to send me your full name and mailing address.