Pelikan M605 White Transparent: Easy Clean?

Pelikan M605 White Transparent detail

Yes. It cleaned up just fine. That was a question we all had, looking at Pelikan M605 White Transparent. The pen is totally white, except where it’s actually transparent. Incredible looking, but a little concerning, too.

I filled the pen on November 13 with Papier Plume Bayou Nightfall, a lovely ink that’s a grayish blue with a green tint. Bayou Nightfall is not a bright pink or purple, but I did keep it inked for more than two weeks before cleaning it out.

Cleanup was easy and fast, and, as you can see above, there was no staining. The white piston still looks perfect, even up close.

Pelikan M605 White Transparent detail

I can’t say I was seriously worried. It’s a Pelikan, and I have confidence in the brand. I also have confidence in Papier Plume inks, and I know Bayou Nightfall is easy-to-clean. But this pen’s white piston was new to me, and it’s still good to see.

Now that the White Transparent passed its first test, I have a test of my own: figuring out what ink to use next. I’ve been thinking about Pelikan Edelstein Ruby — a favorite red ink and a nice holiday color. My hesitation? Will Edelstein Ruby make the pen look like a candy cane? And if it does, will that be a bad thing?

Decisions, decisions.

 

6 thoughts on “Pelikan M605 White Transparent: Easy Clean?

    1. I love it with Papier Plume Bayou Nightfall. It currently has PP Oyster Grey, which is also nice. The pen has a medium nib or I’d actually use a black from Pelikan or the new KWZ Warsaw Dreaming, which I have a sample of and really like.

      You know, any of the three new KWZ inks would be great: there is also Walk Over Vistula and Baltic Memories, the latter of which people who missed Northern Twilight will especially appreciate. I should put up writing samples.

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  1. Go ahead and try that red ink. If you don’t like it, flush and refill with something else. Even if it looked like a candy cane, it would be cool. Make sure to take pictures before you drain the ink. (either by using it, or dispatching it for another color)

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